vibroplex bug

Sadly the serial plate is missing so there is a limit as to how accurate we can date it. The paddle and knob are plastic as opposed to Bakelite, so I think that puts it closer to the late s than the early s. As well as being decidedly grubby, the two nickel- plated binding posts had been replaced with ugly insulated ones and one of the brass strips under the base plate had been replaced with a heavy wire and the three rubber feet were as hard as glass! Hard to imagine, but the photograph on the right is the same key! The nickel- plated parts cleaned up rather nicely. I got a couple of nickel- plated non- insulated 2BA binding- posts on Ebay and replaced the rock- hard feet with new rubber ones. I managed to find a good photograph of a suitable brass serial plate and printed it onto glossy paper which I then built up to two layers of paper to give it a more authentic appearance. This is a very pleasant key to use with a light yet positive action. The thickness of the pendulum main- spring is 0.

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This is a vibroplex bug I recently bought. The Serial number is The decal is like new with all the pin stripping! Huppee which is engraved down by the damper.

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The History of Wireless: Either audibly or by radio – DX will be!! DX is an early telephone term for distant exchange. The term DX appears in many math formulas as distance of x. See Origin of DX. At any rate, for Amateur Radio, it is the sending of messages over long distances. They noticed that when an amber was rubbed with other materials it became charged with an unknown force that had the power to attract objects such as dried leaves, feathers, bits of cloth, or other lightweight materials.

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This resulted, by the time the last major telegraph offices were shuttered well over a hundred years later, in a multitude of different key designs and concepts. Very likely many thousands of different designs. It is probably the most ubiquitous design of key in existence. The straight key, as it is known, is familiar to all…. But it had two major disadvantages.

Vibroplex had Martin modify a stock #1,, bug by moving the fixed dash contact next to the key lever to make it similar in operation as a “Gold Bug”. He was also instructed to modified a stock “Gold Bug” by adding a fixed dash contact opposite the vibrator to make it look and operate as in the #1,, design.

If some do not load, click “Reload Page”. BUGS Semi-automatic telegraph keys – – – – – – – – – – These keys that made dots automatically were first patented in by Horace Martin to help operators send faster code with less effort. The instruments are in approximate chronological order: He has been able to reconstruct many of the dates of manufacture of the various models of Vibroplex keys which had been lost in the Vibroplex fire.

To use this summary, first find the serial number on your Vibroplex. It will be stamped into the label on later models and into the damper or other parts on early models. Then use this table to find the approximate date of manufacture: Shorting switch on the right side. No label or numbers. The action is quite complex and operates on the ‘release of tension on the lever’ principle to circumvent the Martin-Vibroplex patent. Pressing the left lever or pushing down on the left top cylinder pulls a diagonal metal rod away from the vibrating lever allowing it to vibrate.

Releasing the lever returns the diagnonal rod to its original postion thus damping the ocsillating lever.

NON-VIBROPLEX BUGS:

Hand crafted brand new Jokey and KBX keys for sale here! You can offer or donate any spare key you have! It will get a good home.

A report on identifying and dating Vibroplex Bugs by Paul Bock – K4MSG of Hamilton, Virginia. I have provided descriptive information to assist the interested collector or owner of Vibroplex semi-automatic keys in identifying the various models and determining their authenticity.

No other collectors so far have claimed to have seen one which could make this bug even rarer than the elusive Vibroplex Midget. This bug represents the fourth patent by Horace G. Martin 1, , filed on July 1, and was one of three bugs he invented while he was living in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Previously, it has been generally assumed that no production models were ever produced from this patent.

Considering this recent discovery, I thought it would be timely to document some history associated with this patent. There is significant information available about this patent because it was used by the Vibroplex Company in a lawsuit that I briefly referred to in February’s column.

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Vibroplex Bug. Hello group Was wondering if anyone had the same experience as I have. Got a Vibroplex Classic a few months ago and took quite awhile .

If some do not load, click “Reload Page”. BUGS Semi-automatic telegraph keys – – – – – – – – – – These keys that made dots automatically were first patented in by Horace Martin to help operators send faster code with less effort. The instruments are in approximate chronological order: He has been able to reconstruct many of the dates of manufacture of the various models of Vibroplex keys which had been lost in the Vibroplex fire.

To use this summary, first find the serial number on your Vibroplex. It will be stamped into the label on later models and into the damper or other parts on early models. Then use this table to find the approximate date of manufacture: It used a DC voltage to activate the mechanism which made automatic dots. These two keys appeared at the Antique Wireless Association conference.

They have no serial numbers but the hardware indicates that they are very early models. The very early nametag simply says: This model is also called the ‘single point key’ because it uses a single set of contacts for both dots and dashes. Circa With connecting wedge contact stamped: Unusual All Nickel-plated base.

The VIBROPLEX® family of QUALITY AMATEUR RADIO PRODUCTS

Characteristics such as style of the hardware, paint finishes and color, type of plating, serial number, etc. But sometimes we get fooled. This is particularly true when buying “sight unseen” or strictly from photographs, and from non-collectors who may not really know what they have and do not provide adequate detailed descriptive information – usually a “sin of omission” with no real deception intended. Such was the case on a recent “bug” purchase made using eBay. The item in question was ostensibly a Vibroplex Junior, a less-common model that was actually manufactured between the early s and but only actively advertised from onward.

It was a “standard” Vibroplex Original but with the parts mounted on a slightly smaller base 6″ x 3″ instead of the usual 6.

yet it did work fine as a “squeeze key” once with the > ground wire on the base of the key where VibroPlex tells u to put it. have > any of u had this problem? I’m wondering if the paint on the base of the > key paddles occasionally acts as an insulator.

I had not seen one of these Vibroplex Nametags before someone brought one to my table at the Dayton Hamfest. It is obviously designed to be attached to a Vibroplex carrying case as shown in the photo: Other collectors tell me that this decal is fairly common. The Vibroplex exhibit booth was constantly busy and sold a lot of keys and parts.

This is the only known example of this incredibly small and exceptionally strange bug. It carries the stamped wording: The threading on the screws does not appear to be American standard so the bug may have been made in Britain or some other country.

How to Properly Adjust and Use a Vibroplex Bug

You can offer or donate any spare key you have! It will get a good home. Donors will be credited!

A Vibroplex “Bug” semi-automatic keyer. Shown with its fitted case in the background. A beautiful piece of mechanical ingenuity. The Vibroplex, and other keys that copied the concept (often infringing upon Martin’s patents) became the standard in telegraph offices and later, radio rooms, the world over.

Made Yeoman and was CY of Swan at some stage. Sure hope I’m wrong. Has anyone else heard anything? It certainly is the Rod Clover Frank remembers, can anyone provide additional information? The following was provided by Dave Sutherland: June 2, at Grafton Hospital. Loving husband of Gloria, dear son of Len and Betty both dec. Aged 66 Years “Will be sadly missed by all” Privately cremated. I have followed the site for some years and enjoyed the opportunities to see what other ex Comms are doing but it seems we have devolved into a forum for Shorty’s quite concise NSW Naval Ceremonial reports or death notices.

1922 Vibroplex “Original” Semiautomatic Key / Bug